Will You Be There?

In honor of what would have been Michael Jackson’s 56th birthday (I had no idea his birthday was only two days different than mine), it is worth revisiting this magnificent video of Will You Be There.  I encourage you to look up the lyrics and read them, perhaps while watching this clip. Think of someone you love. It is wonderfully moving and uplifting….simply gorgeous.

In our darkest hour, in my deepest despair, will you still care? Will you be there?
In my trials, and my tribulations, through our doubts, and frustrations.
In my violence. In my turbulence. Through my fear, and my confessions.
In my anguish, and my pain. Through my joy, and my sorrow.
In the promise of another tomorrow.
I’ll never let you part, for you’re always in my heart.

This is taken from his Live in Bucharest DVD, available on Amazon. It is not a particularly good rip in terms of video quality, but the audio is very good. Enjoy.

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Gooyash

I found this while cleaning up some files on my hard drive.  It is something I wrote for our second Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church cookbook.  I am a member of a gospel choir called the Cedar Lake Seven, which is based out of BMPC, and this story chronicles some of the adventure we had when touring Hungary in early 2002. It also provides my take on Hungarian Goulash, one of the more memorable meals we had on our trip.

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In the early 2000’s, the Cedar Lake Seven had an opportunity to visit Hungary.  They was the result of an exchange, a partnership with the Reformed Church of Hungary.  The Hungarians had been to Minnesota a few years earlier, and made the gesture of inviting the Americans to come and see them.  It took a few years for it all to come together, but we made a plan to go in the fall of 2001.  After September 2001, the world changed, and we had to alter our plans.  We would up delaying our trip by a few months, and it moved forward in the spring of 2002.

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Take It Down

It’s been a while since posted a good cover. My love for Patty Griffin is deep and abiding. Here is a recording of her performing Take it Down, from the John Hiatt tribute album called It’ll Come To You. They are both such exceptional songwriters, and her interpretation of his song is breathtaking and gorgeous and sad.  It is one of those songs, like Bonnie Raitt’s cover of Jackson Browne’s My Opening Farewell, that always breaks my heart.  The Wailin’ Jennys do a pretty nice version of Take it Down too, but no one truly compares to Patty.

I’m still married to it all
That ain’t no place to hang around
My love is 50 feet tall

Tears all rusted on my face
And I’m just an empty place
Where your love used to fit

 

Good Knight

Robin Williams died this week. When I saw the news, I started to cry.

Three days ago, I sat sniffling in front of my computer, wiping my eyes, trying to absorb what I was reading — that he was dead, and how it was that he had died. I was in shock and deep sadness for this man that I’d never met, and in the last couple of days I have been trying to understand why. We’ve all been witness to the passing of other significant people. Why does this feel different? I’ve never cried for anyone else.

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Rebog: Why the Funniest People Are Sometimes the Saddest

TIME

I always feel a more intense sense of loss when a fellow alcoholic or addict commits suicide. Possibly because I have thought about it obsessively for years, and slit my wrists on multiple occasions until being forced into rehab and getting sober a year later at the age of 18.

No one will ever know exactly what Robin Williams was thinking and feeling when he made the decision to end his pain the way he did. But I do know he wasn’t seeing himself the way the rest of us saw him.

I first met Robin in 1998 when he came to the Comedy Cellar in New York City to do a guest spot. Comedians tend to be impossible to impress and love to stress how they’re impossible to impress when bigger, far more famous comedians perform sets.

But on this particular night, I noticed that none of the regular…

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Reblog: Robin Williams, RIP, Ctd

A very funny bit.

The Dish

by Dish Staff

Some immediate reaction from Twitter, including many clips of Williams’ greatest moments, here. Several more clips after the jump. A reader writes a moving eulogy:

I’m sure that I’m just one of many Dishheads writing in about the horribly sad death of Robin Williams. I’m a child of the ’90s, and he was a constant fixture of my cultural world through childhood and into adulthood. Not only was he a genuine comedic genius – his bit on the invention of golf [seen above] was legendary long before today, as was his 2001 appearance on Inside the Actors Studio, to name a few drops in the bucket. But his joy, sincerity and warmth of personality left a mark that I am now surprised to find was so deep.

He was consistently open about his struggles with depression, addiction and alcoholism, and it sucks that some combination of those demons managed…

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